Posts Tagged ‘geolocation’

GeoM, part three

October 13, 2010

3rd panel at GeoMThis blog post covers the third of three panel/sessions at GeoM, held at MIT’s NERD Center on Monday. It was hosted by Mike Schneider, SVP Director, Digital Incubator for agency Allen & Gerritsen. For highlights of the 1st panel, click here. For highlights of the 2nd panel, click here. Also, these highlight blog posts may be a bit jumpy, because they are comprised of the tweets I made during the sessions.

This final panel of the day was moderated by Mike Schnieder, and featured Dennis Crowley, founder of Foursquare, Seth Priebatsch, founder of SCVNGR, and Jeff Holden, CEO of Whrrl.

Dennis Crowley began by explaining that Foursquare was the successor to Dodgeball, which was a project he started while a student at NYU. He later sold Dodgeball to Google. He realized Dodgeball had a limited audience/purpose, so later designed Foursquare to appeal to a broader audience. Dennis also explained that check-ins are the beginning of the story, not the end. The data generated can be used for tons of interesting stuff.

The whole panel noted that marriage proposals as well as breakups are now happening via geolocation sites.

Jeff Holden: “Places are more semantically rich than simply location, so the check-in is what’s important because the person has decided to designate the place that they currently are.”

Seth Priebatsch: “Instead of check-ins, @scvngr is based on challenges.”

Dennis Crowley: “Local merchants are now encouraging people to check-in via foursquare. That aspect was never anticipated by us. Reality TV (Bravo etc) shows overlap nicely with foursquare because both are reality-based. Reality TV viewers can now visit and check-in to the places where their favorite shows occur.”

Seth Priebatsch: “SCVNGR’s big goal is to build a game-layer on top of the whole world.”

Seth Priebatsch also asks “What’s the social coefficient of your store’s location?” (How many people go there with friends?) “This type of metric has never been thought about before, because the data wasn’t available. Now it is. When you visit a store or a place with friends, loyalty goes up, and people return more often. It’s a more valuable social experience.”

Dennis Crowley: “Mayors are our best salesforce.”

Dennis Crowley: “It’s not about the check-in, it’s about what you do with the data/knowledge.”

Jeff Holden explained that his background is in recommendation engine from Amazon. That’s where his love for serendipitous discovery came from.

Seth Priebatsch: “The world has not yet reached its fun quota. We can make the world a lot more fun.”

Dennis Crowley: “Just checking-in isn’t all that great on its own, it’s fast becoming a commodity. We’re building things on top of the check-in; it’s what you do with the check-in that counts.”

Jeff Holden: “We’re getting to the point in geolocation where there’s enough awareness to get to mass adoption.”

Dennis Crowley: “This whole world of geolocation startups, where we’re changing the way people interact with their physical environment, is very new. It’s a really good, fun time to be exploring in this (geolocation) space.”

Jeff Holden: “We’re NOW entering the era of the location-based web, which is entirely new, and a very different thing than mobile web. The mobile web was about making the existing internet available on your mobile device. The location-based web is ushering in a new world – a context-aware version of the physical world. These are exciting times!”

Highlights of the 1st panel. Highlights of the 2nd panel. Also, Eric Leist of host A & G has a recap that includes highlights and the blog posts that came out of GeoM.

GeoM, part two

October 6, 2010

2nd session at GeoMThis blog post covers the second of three panel/sessions at GeoM, held at MIT’s NERD Center on Monday. It was hosted by Mike Schneider, SVP Director, Digital Incubator for agency Allen & Gerritsen. For highlights of the 1st panel, click here. Also, these highlight blog posts may be a bit jumpy, because they are comprised of the tweets I made during the sessions.

Session 2: Data and Loyalty
Moderator: Sean Corcoran, analyst at Forrester (@SeanCor)
Panelists: Aaron Strout, CMO, Powered.com (@AaronStrout)
Anne Mai Bertelsen, loyalty and integrated marketing strategy consultant, Mai Strategies (@AnneMai)
Matt Galligan, SimpleGeo Co-founder and CEO (@mg)

Sean Corcoan, Moderator: “Forrester Research shows that Geolocation hasn’t hit huge mass adoption yet, but the growth rate is extremely fast.”

Anne Mai Bertelsen: “Loyalty programs have been around for quite a number of years, so there is precedent for the type of data the geolocation provides. Location data, sentiment data, and spend data can be married to provide new relevant insights for businesses and offers for consumers.”

Matt Galligan: “Police monitor mentions of the word ‘party’ at night on twitter to determine where to station officers; that’s an instance of location data being helpful.”

Aaron Strout: “My experience with some of the companies that are entering into geolocation marketing strategies is that they are not going far enough, fast enough with some of their offers and programs.”

Matt Galligan: “The technology in your pocket is far more advanced than the technology that is checking you out at the store.”

Anne Mai Bertelsen: “For big companies that understand loyalty, social media/geolocation resides in a different department, apart from the rest of the marketing management, which is an impediment to fully realizing the possibilities that geolocation offers.”

Aaron Strout then discusses Augmented Reality, i.e. Yelp’s Monacle feature.

Sean Corcoran, Moderator: “What if Facebook makes a mistake with privacy (and it’s been know to make a few mistakes in privacy) with Facebook Places, will that set geolocation back?”

Anne Mai Bertelsen: “The best traditional loyalty programs require registration and opt-in. Legislators have been watching these loyalty programs for years. People use grocery loyalty because they get value. The expectation in geolocation loyalty programs would be the same to the consumer (i.e. what value am I getting in exchange for checking-in?), although offering up one’s location seems scarier to most consumers.”

Aaron Strout: “Smart companies will set things up so they would get a ping to know when loyal shoppers are in the store. Also, people forget that you can check-in without making it public.”

Anne Mai Bertelsen: “Marketing people don’t mine data well, they just don’t. They aren’t working with good, smart models of loyalty, behavior, and how that translates into sales.”

Matt Galligan: “The geolocation space is already so fragmented, it’s hard for companies to know where to start. At the same time, the geolocation space is starting to get really exciting.”

Earlier in the session, Aaron Strout referenced a case-study of Whole Foods and Trader Joe consumers’ shopping behaviors, and later that link was tweeted. It lives here: Hyper-local traffic measurement and analysis

Me and AaronAfter this session wrapped, it was great to reconnect with Aaron Strout who I met only once in Boston before he relocated to Austin.

Highlights of the 1st panel. Highlights of the 3rd panel. Also, Eric Leist of host A & G has a recap that includes highlights and the blog posts that came out of GeoM.

GeoM, part one

October 5, 2010

I had the privilege of attending GeoM yesterday in Boston, hosted by Mike Schneider, SVP Director, Digital Incubator for agency Allen & Gerritsen. The event was held at the MIT New England Research and Development (NERD) Center in Cambridge. About 200 people attended, of which I’d guess only about 5 or 6 had also attended PodCamp Boston 5 in the same event space the week before.

1st panel at GeoMThere were a total of three panels of three guests each, plus a different moderator for each panel. I will highlight the guests and moderators, with some of the best quotes from each session. This blog post covers the first session. For highlights of the 2nd panel, click here. For highlights of the 3rd panel, click here.

Session 1: Making Money from Location Based Services
Moderator: Jason Keath, founder of SocialFresh (@jakrose)
Panelists: Wayne Sutton, VP of Marketing, TriOut (@WayneSutton), geoblogger
Joshua Karpf, Digital Media Communications Manager, PepsiCo (@jkarpf)
David Chang, VP of Product, WHERE (@changds)

David Chang: “Like any business arena, there is a wide range of results in the geolocation space. Awareness, repeat, leads, ad-based models”

Wayne Sutton: “Geo results could be much higher outside major urban areas where there is less competition”

Moderator Jason Keath: “Challenge: right now geo users are super geeky, super-early-adopters. What’s the path to mass market adoption?”

Wayne Sutton: “Geolocation space is very fragmented, seems like a new one is launching every week.”

[my observation]: Loyalty programs, rewards, advertising are mostly being talked about in terms of monetizing geolocation

David Chang: “MassMarket using some form of geolocation is already here. Now the question is, what will business do with it?”

Joshua Karpf: “Small businesses are creating the most interesting geolocation-based business offers.”

Wayne Sutton: “Increasing check-ins, doesn’t always mean more sales.”

Question for panel: “Where are we going beyond the check-in?”

Jason Keath: “StickyBits – Checking into a product via barcode – then media can be associated with it.”

David Chang: “Groupon, BuySocial, etc., helping businesses to generate sales during downtimes, is the next purpose for geolocation.”

Active vs passive check-ins:

Joshua Karpf: “Does active have more business value? Consumers need to give permission before passive check-ins should be done. You don’t necessarily want to be checked in to every Pepsi you drink walk past.”

Wayne Sutton: “Future of passive check-ins is to tie-in with future plans, i.e. I’m going to MIT NERD Center, check me in automatically when I get there. Also, businesses can’t make a joke out of geolocation offers. Initially Krispy Kreme was giving away but ONE free donut for 6th check-in, which is a joke. Businesses need to give good values for check-ins.”

David Chang: “There’s a big disconnect between how users are using geo-based apps, and the companies (and their dollars) that want to connect with them. Changing behavior is a tough thing. Many large companies as well as start-ups may burn through a lot of money trying to introduce the masses to geolocation.”

Wayne Sutton: “When doing a coupon via geolocation service, make sure it’s long term. A one-time only coupon or discount is the worst.”

Me and WayneAfter this session, I was privileged to speak in depth with Lawrence Ingraham, TriOut’s lead developer, and he graciously took a picture of me with geo-star Wayne.

Highlights of the 2nd panel. Highlights of the 3rd panel. Also, Eric Leist of host A & G has a recap that includes highlights and the blog posts that came out of GeoM.

Geolocation and Personal Safety

October 1, 2010

I had the privilege of facilitating a session on Geolocation for PodCamp Boston 5 last weekend. The conversation was excellent, and I met a lot of great people there. The slide deck is available on SlideShare.net.

A couple weeks ago, I had a great conversation with Gene Blishen, President of Mt. Lehman Credit Union in BC, near Vancouver, on the CU Water Cooler on the potential uses of geolocation in the financial arena.

With Gowalla and Foursquare becoming increasingly popular, and new services such as SCVNGR and Topguest coming into their own, it’s easy to get caught up in the check-in mania.

But at sessions such as PodCamp, and in private conversations, it’s easy to lose the voice of many people who declare, “I will never even sign up for a check-in service because it feels too unsafe.”

Feelings such as these, which are far from a minority point of view, often get overlooked or dismissed by those in geolocation for whom personal safety is not a consideration. These feelings, combined with the recent tragedy of the murders of two real estate agents in Ohio got me thinking about geolocation from the reverse point of view: What if we could use geolocation to make people SAFER?

So I did some research (okay, I looked up “Personal Safety” in the iPhone app store), and discovered that there ARE a handful of iPhone apps that are doing just that, making people MORE safe, and using geolocation technology for that purpose.

Here’s a quick rundown of four:

iWitness – This app appears pretty robust. Not only can you use it send either a safety alert or medical alert, you can also set up a group of up to 16 friends and colleagues who will get an email when you activate the distress call. Your location is automatically included in the distress notification. Another feature is record mode where it will send video and audio of your current situation to the company’s servers. This could be potentially useful in locating the owner in a kidnapping situation.

Rescue – This app is also robust, offering a number of safety features such as auto-detecting what country you are in so that the emergency phone number (911 in the U.S. but different in other countries) is immediately activated with use. Your GPS location, including Google Map link, and phone number is sent to emergency responders when activated. Rescue also puts the iPhone into an alarm state, setting off an audio and visual alarms on the device itself. This company’s web site features two videos which explain how to personalize and use this app.

Silent Bodyguard – Is similar to Rescue, except that instead of the device going off, it remains silent and innocuous while sending out distress emails, texts, tweets and Facebook updates, informing the contacts that the owner is in trouble, and sending the location information as well. I’d be interested if folks in law enforcement have opinions or research on whether silent or full-alarm is the way to go. I bet it probably depends on the situation. My guess is that it’s best to DETER people with harmful intent by making them aware that should any harm happen to the owner, a slate of people including police will be instantly notified with the owner’s current location. Perhaps a big obtrusive lapel button could be worn that says something along the lines of “Don’t mess with me, police and friends know exactly where I am.”

Safety Button – For times when someone is feeling unsafe while out and about, he/she can launch this app, and the user’s location and steps are then transmitted to the company’s servers. If the owner is then met with a dangerous situation, he/she can press the help button alerting one chosen friend with a message that includes the location.

I look forward to the GeoM conference in Boston this Monday. I hope some of these issues are addressed, but I have a feeling they won’t.

PodCamp Boston 5 tomorrow!

September 24, 2010

PCWM_10SurveySays

PodCamp Boston 5 starts tomorrow, and I’m excited to be going there with my sweetheart, Lesley Lambert. Both she and I will be facilitating sessions on Sunday. Lesley’s topic is Advanced Twitter, and I’ll be facilitating a discussion on Geolocation. I’ve facilitated sessions on Geolocation at RE BarCamp Orlando and RE BarCamp Rye, and my slidedeck for it has been viewed 1,178 times on Slideshare.net. I’ll be modifying the presentation for the PodCamp environment versus the real estate camp.

This will be my third PodCamp Boston, and lucky 13th camp of any variety.

I love the things that happen at camps, the people, the sessions, the networking, the brainstorming, the learning, the teaching, the sharing, the connections that people make. Being somewhat of a Camp veteran, I especially enjoy helping newcomers have a good experience as much as I enjoy reconnecting with old friends. I also love “seeing” the camp through others’ eyes, especially Camp virgins, but I love veteran’s thoughts, photos, videos, blogs, tweets, and whatever other media is produced.

Here are some links looking back at my previous Camp experiences, including PodCamp Boston 2, where I knew no one going into it, but made some great friends:

Looking forward to what this weekend brings at PodCamp Boston 5!

Geolocation is now rewarding

September 7, 2010

Family photo at Camden Yards, Oriole Wall of FameThis past weekend, I travelled with my family down to Baltimore for a reunion, including catching a ballgame at Camden Yards. While we were there, we stayed at the Crowne Plaza hotel in Timonium, MD. I’ve been using geolocation service Gowalla since Baer Tierkel turned me on to it in November of last year (2009). So upon arrival at the hotel, I opened the Gowalla app on my iPhone to check in. I immediately noticed that instead of a generic hotel icon, the Crowne Plaza had its own snazzy custom icon.

Crowne Plaza Gowalla iconSince the icon was so cool, I decided to send my Crowne Plaza check-in to Facebook and twitter. Within a short time, I noticed that a company I had never heard of sent me this tweet in response to my check-in:

Hi @mmpartee, join Topguest to get 50 Priority Club points for your next Crowne Plaza @gowalla check-in

Since I was busy with a family reunion, I didn’t have time to investigate this meaning behind this tweet until I returned home. So this morning, I visited the Topguest site, and noticed they had a Facebook page, which is good since there is very little about them on their own site. Via their Facebook page, I discovered this is a very new (4 month old) start-up based out of NYC.

They have 4 hotel reward programs under their belt, and they accept check-ins from all the major geolocation services: Brightkite, Foursquare, Gowalla, Facebook Places, and Twitter location. Topguest ties your geolocation check-in method(s) of choice to your hotel reward program(s) of choice. Since I love Gowalla and am already a Priority Club member, it was a snap for me to link the two. Priority Club encompasses the InterContinental Hotels Group (ICHG) which includes: Holiday Inn, Holiday Inn Express, Crowne Plaza, Staybridge Suites, and another recent discovery I love: Hotel Indigo.

Geolocation: it’s not just for mayorships and games anymore…

Geolocation, Geolocation, Geolocation

August 26, 2010

Climbing Mt. TomI’ve been following the developments of our geolocation-enabled world for many years now, starting with car GPS navigators and geocaching, through to Gowalla and now Facebook places. Geolocation’s ubiquity is part of the reason this blog is called World 2.0.

There are some applications of geolocation in the credit union world, in social media in general, and there are even more applications in the field of real estate.

I had the great honor to present a session on geolocation at RE BarCamp Orlando yesterday. I received some excellent feedback from it, and the slide deck was featured on Slideshare.net‘s home page this morning.

I hope to present this session at RE BarCamp New Hampshire!


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,917 other followers